George Brockway Tree honours Narrogin’s ‘forgotten conservationist’

Emma TaylorThe West Australian
Relatives of Walter Brockway who attended the opening ceremony
Camera IconRelatives of Walter Brockway who attended the opening ceremony Credit: Picture: Shire of Narrogin

The Wheatbelt’s “forgotten conservationist” George Brockway has been honoured with a towering salmon gum — the species he was most responsible for conserving — named after him at Yilliminning Rock.

The tree was commemorated in a ceremony last Tuesday at Yilliminning Reserve by Shire president Leigh Ballard, the driver of the project, Roger Underwood, and George’s great-nephew, Walter Brockway.

Signs were also installed at the site outlining Mr Brockway’s work and history, including his significant contribution to woodlands preservation.

The driver behind the project Roger Underwood, Shire President Leigh Ballard, and Great Nephew of George Brockway, Walter Brockway.
Camera IconThe driver behind the project Roger Underwood, Shire President Leigh Ballard, and Great Nephew of George Brockway, Walter Brockway.

Mr Brockway was a pioneer in bushfire control and the creator of conservation reserves in the Wheatbelt, and developed many of the first native flora nurseries in Australia.

He was also responsible for the planting of street trees and farm trees and a leader in the protection of remnant vegetation and bushland corridors.

The event was attended by relatives of the late Mr Brockway, who was born in 1901 and was one of 11 children. Funding came from the Shire of Narrogin, with support from the WA Forest Products Commission and in-kind support from the Institute of Foresters and the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions.

A Shire spokesman said the George Brockway Tree was a great way to commemorate the no-longer-forgotten conservationist.

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