Youth hope for Anzac legacy

Michael TraillNarrogin Observer
Army Cadets took part in a march from the Narrogin Town Hall to the Memorial Park.
Camera IconArmy Cadets took part in a march from the Narrogin Town Hall to the Memorial Park. Credit: Laura Grubisa/Grubisa, Laura Grubisa

Involvement of school-aged children in official ceremonies will not only keep the legacy of our Anzacs alive but grow it.

That is the message from members of the Narrogin RSL sub-branch.

“I believe by using the younger generation, we’re going to keep the Anzac legacy alive,” president Ries Chattillon said.

“Going back a few years, there was no involvement at all but we’ve got them to come to the Remembrance Service and they speak.

“The speakers that come out from the schools research their topics really well. I want to keep that going, because soon there’s going to be no veterans left and whose going to carry that Anzac tradition on.”

NSHS head girl and boy Janka Reynders and Marshall Bowey at the combined schools service.
Camera IconNSHS head girl and boy Janka Reynders and Marshall Bowey at the combined schools service. Credit: Laura Grubisa/Laura Grubisa

Vice-president and New Zealand veteran Neill Dorset shared Mr Chattillon’s view.

“It don’t know if popular is the right word, but the crowds that are attending Anzac Day memorial services are on the increase because the youngsters are starting to be made more aware,” he said.

“I was amazed when we lived in Perth, we went to a service in Kings Park and to see a crowd of over 100,000 there, just blew me away.

“To me Anzac Day is a very special day and I think we should keep it alive as we keep going ahead.”

One the first ever women to go through ADF training at Kapooka, Narelle Webb was involved with the establishment of Narrogin Cadets 24 years ago. Ms Webb said that cadets instilled life skills.

“It’s (the ADF) something that taught me discipline and actually got me the confidence to go out and try different things,” she said.

“We’ve had a few go through there and actually continued onto the air force, army or the navy. It’s really important, it’s taught the ones who have gone through really important life skills.

“They’re going to be ones fighting for us in the future if need be.”

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