Lock’s rams good as gold ahead of ram selling season

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Bob GarnantCountryman
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Narrogin stud ram preparer Ashley Lock, of Lock Livestock Services, steadies a Merino ram at his annual stud display day where rams are inspected at the beginning of the sale season.
Camera IconNarrogin stud ram preparer Ashley Lock, of Lock Livestock Services, steadies a Merino ram at his annual stud display day where rams are inspected at the beginning of the sale season. Credit: Bob Garnant

The ram-selling season will soon commence and kicking it off at Ashley Lock’s annual display of stud rams in Narrogin was a gathering of top industry participants.

The well-known ram preparer, with several decades of expertise, brought out 80 rams into the glorious sunshine to be admired by their owners who rely on Mr Lock to house and feed them prior to their sale or stud duties.

“We were well back on our normal 110 to 120 rams this year because of COVID-19,” Mr Lock said.

But regular participant and Narrogin stud breeder Richard Chadwick, of Darijon stud, was pleased to see his first Poll Merino stud ram coming along nicely.

“Darijon was established in 1975, but we only just began concentrating on Polls, which are in hot demand, but I still like my horned Merinos,” he said.

Mr Chadwick’s Darijon 91 Poll was exhibited at this year’s Wagin Woolorama — where it won its proud owner the champion fine wool Poll Merino ram sash.

Nutrien Narrogin branch manager Graham Broad caught up with visitors at the ram inspection day sporting his companies woollen jumper in Nutrien black.
Camera IconNutrien Narrogin branch manager Graham Broad caught up with visitors at the ram inspection day sporting his companies woollen jumper in Nutrien black. Credit: Countryman

Nutrien Narrogin branch manager Graham Broad couldn’t resist a sticky-beak of the display.

“The Narrogin area has been having a great season so far, but pastures have been slow getting away,” he said.

“Water is a concern, as is the price of wool.”

Mr Broad was sporting his new company jumper in the Nutrien black.

“Our Narrogin branch is only two years in the making, and now with the Nutrien branding, we have gained excellent community acceptance,” he said.

“My brother, Kevin Broad and our late father Ken, have been involved in the sheep classing industry for many years.”

A good selection of Merino and Poll Merino rams were on display including from the Pickering family's Pyramid Poll stud, at Cascade.
Camera IconA good selection of Merino and Poll Merino rams were on display including from the Pickering family's Pyramid Poll stud, at Cascade. Credit: Bob Garnant

Stud Merino Breeders Association of WA president Scott Pickering had rams on display.

“With many sheep being sold across the boarder, including breeding ewes, this will impact the ram selling season,” he said.

“Many parts of the State are desperate for rainfall, but we were lucky to have an avenue in which to offload excess sheep for good prices.

“The biggest issue is water.”

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